Flyting

nothing stronger or more lasting than twenty-six letters and a handful of punctuation marks

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rewrittengirl asked: Do you have any passages where Leroux describes Erik's house on the lake? Like, I think someone (maybe you) showed how it was probably built in the style of Victorian houses (because he wanted to be normal), and of course his mother's Louis-Philippe furniture, but was there anything else?

fdelopera:

Hi there! Thanks for your question. Leroux actually gives relatively little information about the layout of Erik’s house, though he does describe several of the individual rooms in detail. I was able to reconstruct the possible layout of Erik’s house based on Christine’s descriptions of the rooms she visited, with some help from Victorian-era housing diagrams. See my conjectures here.

We know that there is a drawing room/living room into which one enters from the door off of the lake. This is the room into which Erik first brought Christine, and where he had arranged all of the excessive bouquets of flowers. This room also contains various furniture, wall hangings, vases, and torches (gas or electric) on the wall. David Coward suggests that Erik’s house was lit and powered by electricity, which would have been possible, since in the early 1880s when the story is set, there was limited use of electricity in the Palais Garnier. Erik could have secretly routed the electrical wiring into his house, which could also explain the sheer dazzling brightness and heat of the torture chamber.

Christine’s room, also called the Louis-Philippe Room, is off of the drawing room. It is a small, simply adorned room with an ensuite bathroom with hot and cold running water. It has a simple mahogany bed in the "lit-bateau" style hung with toile de Jouy fabric (like all of the furniture, it once belonged to Erik’s mother); a chaise longue (on which Erik places Christine after he sings her to sleep the first night); an old Louis-Philippe bureau with brass fittings; a pedestal table; a lamp; a clock; waxed mahogany chairs with lace antimacassars; shelves with various knickknacks from Erik’s mother, such as seashells, red pincushions, mother-of-pearl boats, and an enormous ostrich egg; and a mantelpiece on either end of which sit the little boxes containing the infamous scorpion and grasshopper figurines.

Behind the drawing room is a dining room/music room. In this room, there is a little pedestal table where Christine eats the crayfish and chicken wing, and drinks the Tokay wine, that are part of the lunch that Erik has prepared. This is also the room where Erik plays the harp and the piano, and is the room where the unmasking takes place.

Erik’s room is off of the dining room/music room. As Christine describes in “Apollo’s Lyre”:

"The walls were all hung in black, but in place of the ornamental white tears that normally complement this funereal decoration, I saw the repeated notes of the Dies Irae on an enormous music stave. In the center of the room, there was a canopy from which hung curtains of red brocatelle, and beneath this canopy, there was an open coffin. […] I received such a sinister feeling from that sight that I turned my head. My eyes then encountered the keyboard of an organ that took up an entire side of the wall. On the music stand there was a notation book, scrawled throughout with notes of red. I asked permission to look at it, and I read on the title page: Don Juan Triumphant.”

Off of Christine’s room/the Louis-Philippe room sits the torture chamber. The torture chamber is a small, hexagonal room, with its six walls entirely covered with mirrored panels. These mirrored panels fit into winding drums which can be turned in order to change the illusion reflecting in the mirrors. In the corner of the room sits the iron tree with the thin noose that serves as a gibbet.

Directly below the torture chamber lies the gunpowder room filled with barrels of explosives. Also beneath Erik’s apartment is his wine cellar.

The one room that is conspicuously absent from Leroux’s description is the kitchen. I surmise that this room is probably located behind the dining room, as would be consistent with contemporary housing construction.

Filed under useful! And mostly how I pictured it Although for some reason I thought the chaise and the shelves of knicknacks were in the drawing room instead of in Christine's room Looks like I need to re-read

120 notes

xkcds:

I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.
Writing Skills [explained]

xkcds:

I’d like to find a corpus of writing from children in a non-self-selected sample (e.g. handwritten letters to the president from everyone in the same teacher’s 7th grade class every year)—and score the kids today versus the kids 20 years ago on various objective measures of writing quality. I’ve heard the idea that exposure to all this amateur peer practice is hurting us, but I’d bet on the generation that conducts the bulk of their social lives via the written word over the generation that occasionally wrote book reports and letters to grandma once a year, any day.

Writing Skills [explained]

(via nellysketchesnstuff)

Filed under much truth Just the other day I was looking for research on what effect the proliferation of internet access has had on the development of reading skills It's surprising that there haven't been many intensive studies into this yet Also James Joyce was a disgusting person and no one should read his love letters ever